Thunker’s Weblog


What If I Don’t Want To?

Robert Wheadon-126x150

“If I can stop one heart from breaking,                                                                                                     I shall not live in vain;                                                                                                                                     If I can ease one life the aching,                                                                                                                Or cool one pain,                                                                                                                                            Or help one fainting robin                                                                                                                     Unto his nest again,                                                                                                                                         I shall not live in vain.”                                                                                                                                   (Emily Dickinson, VI)

Emily Dickinson is one of America’s greats.  Her poetry is sensitive, thought-provoking and emotive.  I love this poem of hers, as it expresses so many of the desires of seekers of truth.  Being concerned with lifting the burdens of the weary, easing the souls of the downtrodden and caring for the casualties of this world is a job not for the half-hearted.  It is, however, a job for the meek.

Meekness is not for the timid. You have to be tough to be meek.  Yet, in society, the word portrays weakness, softness, and lacking in worldly worth.  A meek person is seen as afraid of whatever shadow might appear and cause one to tremble, shudder and hide.

The word, “humility,” gets tossed around with frequency in conjunction with meekness.  I believe humility brings us closer to the true nature of meekness, but not all the way.  The two traits are siblings on the same strait and narrow course.  Yet, why even talk about the meekness?

Well, there is a lot riding on this word.  Remember the Savior’s words in the Sermon on the Mount?  “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth,” (Matthew 5:5.)  That is quite a weighty promise, especially if the promised inheritance is a divinely cleansed, celestially blessed earth.  I’m not sure I want the planet in its current state.  The future, though, is promised to be bright! (Revelations 21:1)

So, let’s examine meekness and why practicing meekness is not for the weak-kneed.  At it’s locus, the quality of meekness is enshrined in the hearts of the teachable.

Meekness is at the center of a disciple’s life.  Without the willingness to use our faith to look heavenward as our trials, cares and concerns seem to be crashing all around our heads, we tend to “rage, rage against the dying of the light,” (Dylan Thomas, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.”)  To possess faith requires meekness;  we humbly accept that God will wipe away our tears and bear us up to a brighter day.  It is recognition that we cannot return to heaven solely by our own merits, but through the sacrifice of God’s Son, that shows the power of meekness.  To know that God is God and we are His children allows us to put ourselves aside and put our trust in Him.

It seems meekness is one of those things that, like most things, we work at and learn over a lifetime.  And we need to.  We like to hang on to things and not turn them over to God.  We think we know better, gifting ourselves with more wisdom than spiritual insight would allow.  For example, we love our material possessions.  It’s not a new problem.  It is a persistent one, though.  Remember the young man’s encounter with the Savior in the New Testament?  The young man approached and asked what we all ask:

“…what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life? (Matt. 19:16)

The Savior responded initially with counsel to live the ten commandments.  And then:

“20 The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet?

21 Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me.

22 But when the young man heard that saying, he went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions.” (Matt. 19:20-22)

I am not suggesting we all sell everything we have and head to a hermitage.  Rather, here then is the question to ask ourselves.  What are we too prideful or even afraid to give up to continue our journey towards Jesus?  For the young man, he wasn’t willing to divulge himself of possessions, of which he had many.

What do we hang on to?  Do we hang on to pride, or selfishness, or of taking offense?  All of these attributes keep the doors of meekness and humility closed.

We all ask what do we need in order to gain eternal life.  Are we willing to accept God’s answer and act upon it?

God has given each of us agency, the freedom to choose light or darkness.  And God would have it no other way.  There is no divine cattle-prod forcing us onto the path.  We have to want it enough to choose it and choose Him.  Meekness is advanced discipleship.  Meekness is thoughtfulness.  Meekness is listening for God’s strong, yet quiet whispers to us each day.  Meekness is trying to maintain a perspective on eternity rather than the short-sighted view of mortality.

Once, a lawyer in the law came to Jesus and asked Him the same question that the young man had posited.  The lawyer said:

25 ¶And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?

27 And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself.

28 And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.” (Luke 10:25-28)

The answer supplied by the lawyer, of loving God and neighbor, is both motivational and directional.  Yes, we are to love God and others and demonstrate that love.  The two commandments also focus us away from ourselves and towards God and His children.  That is meekness.

Meekness concentrates us on daily discovering what God wants to teach us, rather than our myopic, limited view that we already know it all.

So, time for a wake up call!  Let’s get meek!IMG_0196

Be kind, make good memories and come back soon.

 

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4 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Really great, Robert! Thanks for sharing these thoughts. They are always uplifting.

Comment by Sydney Wheadon

Thanks!

Comment by thunker

Meek IS tough! And often misunderstood as you’ve alluded to. It is a part of dying to self daily, and flesh doesn’t particularly enjoy that.

Comment by Not So Random Chick

Definitely. I like that thought.

Comment by thunker




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