Thunker’s Weblog


Faith is What?

Robert Wheadon-126x150

img_2128

Let’s talk about something that can’t be seen, but can be shown in our actions.  And I’m not talking about rocketship underpants.  Recently I’ve been pondering the meaning of faith as a point of personal motivation and core of religious belief.  Faith is one of those terms that is bandied about with immense frequency, but rarely with clear application.  I believe this is due to the many ways we put the term, “faith” to use.

Faith can be a church, (the noun) with which we affiliate, or an inner belief, (the verb), which can drive many of our actions. Both usages interplay with each other.  For example, my inner beliefs can motivate my actions within my religious community.  My beliefs drive actions, which in turn allows my actions to manifest my beliefs.  How’s that for circumlocution!

Biblically, we are taught that “faith is the substance (assurance) of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen,” (Hebrews 1:11.)

While I agree with that general definition, faith becomes much clearer for me when focused on Jesus Christ.  To merely say I have faith is too ephemeral, empty and even vacuous. To tie my faith to the person of Jesus Christ is a proposition with much more substance and meaning.

In fact, it is everything.  Faith in Jesus Christ is what heals the wounds of our hearts.  Faith in Jesus Christ leads us to turn from error and turn towards Him.  Faith in Jesus Christ allows divine grace to save us.

Faith in Jesus Christ also requires some effort.  The apostle Paul recorded in Romans 10:13-14:                                                                                                                                                                 “13 For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.                                     14 How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard…?”

Joseph Smith, in the Lectures on Faith, wrote:

“2 Let us here observe, that three things are necessary, in order that any rational and intelligent being may exercise faith in God unto life and salvation.

3 First, The idea that he actually exists.

4 Secondly, A correct idea of his character, perfections and attributes.

5 Thirdly, An actual knowledge that the course of life which he is pursuing, is according to his will.—For without an acquaintance with these three important facts, the faith of every rational being must be imperfect and unproductive; but with this understanding, it can become perfect and fruitful, abounding in righteousness unto the praise and glory of God the Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ,” (Lectures on Faith, #3.)

The language here is of relationship.  It is learning who Jesus Christ is and what He does and how His actions impact each of us.  If we don’t know anything of Jesus, how can we possibly place our faith in His grace and goodness?

And faith requires us to make an effort.  In Matthew 11:28-30, the Savior taught:

“28 ¶Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

Notice the very first words?  We are required to come to Him. We must make the effort to learn of Jesus and re-direction ourselves towards Him.  In verse 29, the invitation to action continues.  “Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me…”

In the book, “The Crucible of Doubt,” Teryl and Fiona Givens discuss how many desire the path of faith to be walked for them.  The Givens write: “Christ invites us to assume the yoke, but we would rather ride in the cart,” The Crucible of Doubt, pg 62.)  Faith is not acquired or strengthened through a Laz-e-boy lounger approach.

It is often said that faith is a word of action.  Faith in the Lord, Jesus Christ, has the same requirement.  And the wonderful thing with developing faith in the Savior is that it doesn’t matter if we feel a strong confidence with God, possess an abstract association with deity, or merely think we might want to see what this faith thing is all about.  The Book of Mormon prophet, Alma, encourages all to make the effort.  He said:

“27 But behold, if ye will awake and arouse your faculties, even to an experiment upon my words, and exercise a particle of faith, yea, even if ye can no more than desire to believe, let this desire work in you, even until ye believe in a manner that ye can give place for a portion of my words,” (Alma 32:27.)

Lastly, where should this effort be directed?  A couple of thoughts include:

  1. Read about Jesus, take in his teachings and thoughts.  In other words, read the scriptures. Read the Four Gospels, read 3 Nephi in the Book of Mormon, read Doctrine & Covenants, sections 19, 76, 88, or 138.  The apostle John wrote:

“39 ¶Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me,” (John 5:39.)

2. Devote some quality time to prayer and thought.  Matthew wrote:

“22 And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive,” (Matthew 21:22.)

Try it!  Our efforts are done with the goal of turning our hearts towards God, of learning about His son, and then making the effort to try and live our lives as Jesus did.

Sound fun?  It is.

 

Advertisements

6 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Loved it, Robert! Expecially the part about we would rather ride in the cart than take His yoke upon us.

Comment by Sydney Wheadon

Thanks! Glad you enjoyed it. That quote is one of my favorites, as well.

Comment by thunker

Have you considered submitting your thoughts to the Ensign magazine? I did once and they published it. Good job. Dad

Comment by Peter

I haven’t, but that’s a great idea. Thanks.

Comment by thunker

I love these thoughts! I really needed to think about faith today and how to better apply it.

Comment by Annie

Thanks, Annie! So glad you shared your thoughts with me.

Comment by thunker




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: